Menu Toggle menu

Professors Mank and Lenhart Receive 2017 Award for Faculty Excellence


Cincinnati, OH—Professors Brad Mank and Elizabeth Lenhart received the university-level Award for Faculty Excellence. This award is given by the Office of the Provost and the Office of the Vice President for Research.

Professor Brad Mank, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the James B. Helmer Professor of Law, is recognized for his service and scholarship contributions to the College of Law. During the last few years, he has published, or had accepted for publication, numerous articles and essays, including articles in the Notre Dame Law Review and the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. While maintaining an active scholarly agenda, Professor Mank has chaired the Academic Policy and Curriculum (APC) Committee over several years of significant work, has served as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and served as co-chair of the site visit committee. Each of these service activities has required significant additional responsibility.

Additionally, Professor Mank is a highly regarded teacher in the areas of administrative, natural resources, and environmental law. And he serves as an advisor to the Immigration and Nationality Law Review (INLR), an internationally recognized, student-run law journal.

Professor Elizabeth Lenhart is recognized for her service and teaching contributions to the College of Law. Professor Lenhart brings significant practical experience with oral arguments, motion practice, and other professional skills to the classes she teaches. Prior to joining the College of Law faculty, she was a senior associate at Frost Brown Todd, focusing on complex business litigation, including all aspects of antitrust, business torts, unfair competition, shareholder derivative suites, and class action litigation. She was named an Ohio Super Lawyer Rising Star 2009 for commercial litigation.

Professor Lenhart is a gifted teacher, having received the College of Law’s Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching three times (in 2011, 2014, and 2016). In addition to her consistent high level of service to the College of Law, Professor Lenhart undertook a significant service project this year. She research and then drafted a report titled “Legal Research at the University of Cincinnati, College of Law; An Informal Report Based on Conversations with Practitioners and Students about What We’re Doing Right – and What We Can Do Even Better.” Her report was based on discussions with law students and members of the Cincinnati Bar about the research skills necessary to be a successful lawyer. As technology and the legal research landscape continue to evolve, her report and continuing research into methodologies of legal research will contribute to the College of Law’s ongoing evaluation of its learning outcomes in the area of legal research.

About the Award for Faculty Excellence
The Award for Faculty Excellence is intended to annually recognize outstanding faculty members in each college who represent excellence in all its forms. These awards are for those individuals nominated by their dean in recognition for exceptional performance in their college or department during the past year. They may have done an outstanding job of service in an especially significant fashion; perhaps their research has received special recognition; or their teaching has been especially innovative or important in meeting new milestones or changing the department or college culture. It is important that the nominee embody the Principles of a Just Community in practice through civility, honor, inclusion, integrity, or the promotion of justice.

Professor Solimine Receives University’s Excellence Award for Research Mentoring


Professor Michael Solimine receives the university-level Excellence Award for Faculty-to-Faculty Research Mentoring, a new award given by the Office of the Provost and the Office of the Vice President for Research.

The Excellence Award for Faculty-to-Faculty Research Mentoring is intended to annually recognize outstanding faculty members in each college who have demonstrated research mentorship with faculty at various stages of their careers. Research mentorship may come in various forms, with the understanding that many times mentorship is discipline-specific, and these various forms of mentorship will be considered equally. The award decision will be made at the dean’s discretion based on criteria that include demonstrable mentoring activities that support the development and success of peer faculty in clinical, translational, or basic science research.

This award is meant to recognize faculty contributions to their respective colleges, to the UC research enterprise, and to recognize the mentoring and support of emerging research faculty.

Professor Solimine has taught at the College of Law since 1986, received tenure in 1991, and since 1994 has served as the Donald P. Klekamp Professor of Law. He has demonstrably achieved excellence in research, teaching and service throughout that period.

With regard to research, Professor Solimine is nationally and internationally recognized as one of the leading scholars in the American civil litigation systems, including civil procedure, federal courts, conflict of laws, as well as election law. His scholarly work consists of six books (a monograph on federal courts (Greenwood Press), a casebook on appellate practice (West Publishing), two casebooks on election law (Carolina Academic Press), and two books for judges and lawyers on civil practice in Ohio courts (LexisNexis), and over 60 substantial articles, as well as numerous book reviews and shorter essays. His articles have been published in both peer-reviewed journals (e.g., Journal of Legal Studies, Supreme Court Economic Review) and in the law reviews of the top-ranked law schools in the United States (e.g., Michigan Law Review; Wisconsin Law Review; North Carolina Law Review; Ohio State Law Journal; Cornell International Law Journal; Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy). He has been invited to participate in and has published in 20 symposia, delivered scholarly papers at annual meetings of the Association of American Law Schools, and the Midwest Political Science Association, and by invitation contributed essays to academic blogs.

Professor Solimine has received four separate recognition awards from the College of Law for his scholarship. This spring he will receive the university’s Faculty Career Award. The distinguished character of his work is reflected in the numerous times his work has been cited and discussed in other books and articles. His work has been cited and discussed in over 2000 books and articles. Also, his work has been cited in the decisions of numerous federal court decisions (including the U.S. Supreme Court), and by the state supreme courts of Ohio and Iowa.

Professor Solimine has made frequent mentoring contributions. At the College of Law he has often served as chair of the RPT Committee, which plays an important role in mentoring faculty. Professor Solimine consistently reads and comments on works in progress of his colleagues, often providing critical input on articles and books. He also regularly assists colleagues at the College by providing them research and other materials relevant to their work.

Congratulations to Professor Solimine who truly demonstrates an ongoing commitment to research mentoring.

Dean Emeritus Tomain Publishes Book Examining Clean Energy Policies


The United States has been experiencing an energy transition for over four decades, and now - thanks to the Clean Power Plan of the Obama Administration and the Paris climate agreement - a clean energy future is moving closer to reality. In Clean Power Politics, Joseph Tomain describes how clean energy policies have been developed and, more importantly, what's necessary for a successful transition to a clean energy future, including technological innovation, new business models, and regulatory reforms.

The energy system of the future will minimize the environmental costs of traditional energy production and consumption, and emphasize expanded use of natural resources and energy efficiency. Because many new energy technologies can be produced and consumed at smaller scales, they will shift decision-making power away from traditional utilities and empower consumers to make energy choices about consumption and price. In this way, a clean energy future embodies a democratization of energy.

Joseph P. Tomain is Dean Emeritus and the Wilbert & Helen Ziegler Professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law. Dean Tomain's research and teaching interests have focused on Energy Law, Land Use, Government Regulation, and Contracts. Dean Tomain received his J.D. from George Washington University National Law Center and his A.B. from the University of Notre Dame.

Buy the book from Cambridge University Press or Amazon (available in hardcover and Kindle).
Also read Ending Dirty Energy Policy: Prelude to Climate Change, by Joseph P. Tomain.
Read "Clean Energy and the Myth of Free Markets," by Joseph P. Tomain, January 2, 2017, in The Cincinnati Enquirer.
Read "Gorsuch Must Show Commitment to a Democratic America," by Joseph P. Tomain, February 22, 2017, in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Dean Bard Teaches Short Course on Human Subject Research


During the first week of January, Dean Bard co-taught a week long course in human subject research with long-time adjunct and Dinsmore & Shohl partner, Dr. Frank Woodside, a first in short course history. Eight students participated in the class.

The course included lively discussion of the legal and ethical issues that govern research either funded by the federal government or intended to prove the safety & efficacy of new prescription drugs or devices. The students also enjoyed presentations from the Vice President for Research’s Office, including Dr. Jane Strasser, Associate Vice President for Research and Comparative Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, Mike Linke (the chair of the University of Cincinnati’s Institutional Review Board), Angela Braggs-Brown (the director of the Office of Human Subject Research) and Holly Bante, Director, Conflict of Interest & Asst. Professor, College of Medicine. Click here for more pictures from the class.

“It was a fun and energizing way to start the semester. Human Subject Research regulation has been one of my primary areas of scholarship.” It presents complex regulatory issues that are relevant to any program that gets federal funding but it also has interesting ethical issues about how much risk individuals should be allowed to take. Research compliance is also a growth area in terms of hiring lawyers so I wanted to introduce students to something that would open new career doors for them.”

Said Dr. Woodside “I appreciate that I was asked to participate; learned a great deal; enjoyed the interaction with the students.”

Angela Braggs-Brown is the Director of UC’s Human Research Protection Program (HRPP), she is also a member of the UC IRB. She has been involved with FDA regulated research in addition to social behavioral and policy research over the last 15 years. Ms. Braggs-Brown is Regulatory Affairs Certified (RAC) as well as a Certified IRB Professional (CIP).

Dr. Mike Linke has served on the University of Cincinnati IRB for over 20 years and was appointed Chair in 2004. Dr. Linke is a Health Science Officer at the Cincinnati VA Medical Center and an Associate Professor at the UC College of Medicine. In 2012, under his leadership the UC IRB Social and Behavioral IRB merged with the Medical IRB to form a single IRB that reviews all human subjects research conducted at UC. He now serves as Chair of the combined board. He led the formation of the National Institutes of Health StrokeNet Central IRB and serves as Chair of the Central IRB. StrokeNet is funded by the NIH to conduct clinical trials for stroke prevention, treatment, and recovery. UC serves as the National Clinical Coordinating Center and the network consists of 25 Regional Coordinating Centers with over 300 clinical sites. Awarded the Greater Cincinnati Health Council’s first ever Servant Leadership Award for his efforts in creating and leading the Consortium of Greater Cincinnati IRBs He also serves in various roles in the VA human subjects protection program and has been actively involved in the human subjects research accreditation processes at UC and the VA.

Jane Strasser is the Associate Vice President for Research and Comparative Medicine at UC. As UC’s Institutional Official she is responsible for ensuring that the Human Research Protection Program is supported and compliant. As the Research Integrity Officer she is responsible for investigating allegations of research misconduct and protecting the integrity of the research record. Dr. Strasser is an Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and the Director of the Office of Research Integrity.

Professor Sandra Sperino’s Work Cited by Third Circuit, Creates Circuit Split


A decision out of the Third Circuit has created a circuit split with three other circuits. On January 10, 2017, the Third Circuit issued an opinion in Karlo v. Pittsburg Glass Works, LLC, No. 15-3435. The Third Circuit held that subgroup claims are allowed in ADEA disparate impact cases, creating a circuit split on the issue. A subgroup claim is when a group of workers tries to establish disparate impact by proving that a subset of older workers were disparately impacted by a decision. For example, in a reduction in force, the employees might argue that workers 50 and older were impacted by the reduction in force compared to workers younger than 50. Read the complete blog posting and Professor Sperino’s article The Sky Remains Intact: Why Allowing Subgroup Evidence is Consistent with the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, 90 Marq. L. Rev. 227 (2006).
Read: Friend of the Court

Professor Brad Mank Named Associate Dean of Academic Affairs


Cincinnati Law Dean Jennifer S. Bard announces the following leadership change: Professor Brad Mank has accepted the position of Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the college. He will assume this role over the summer. After eight years in the position, Professor Nancy Oliver will return to teaching.

Bradford Mank“I look forward to improving our curriculum and to helping communicate about the great programs we already have,” says Professor Mank. He is also excited for the opportunity to working closely with both students and faculty and continuing to teach. “My favorite part of teaching at UC is the small classes, and getting to know very intelligent students,” he shares.

Professor Mank, the James B. Helmer, Jr. Professor of Law, earned his undergraduate degree at Harvard University, graduating summa cum laude, and completed his juris doctor at Yale University, where he was also editor of the Yale Law Journal. After graduating, he clerked for Justice David M. Shea of the Connecticut Supreme Court. Before joining the Cincinnati Law faculty in 1991, Professor Mank served as an assistant attorney general for the State of Connecticut, and an associate with the law firm Murtha, Cullina, Richter, and Pinney in Hartford, Conn., with an emphasis on environmental law.

At the college, Professor Mank teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law and administrative law. A prolific scholar, he has authored many article and book chapters on environmental justice, regulatory reform, and statutory interpretation. His work is frequently cited by courts, by other scholars, and in the press. Locally, he has worked with the City of Cincinnati on numerous environmental ordinances and implementation matters, including issues such as climate change, environmental justice, recycling, and air pollution. And, he has served as chair of the Environmental Advisory Council.

Finally, Professor Mank is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching, the Harold C. Schott Scholarship Award, and the Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence, among others.

Author: Michelle Flanagan, Cincinnati Law Communication Intern

Cincinnati Law’s Entrepreneurship Clinic Director Named U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Legal Champion” for 2016


Cincinnati, OH—Lew Goldfarb, the Director of Cincinnati Law’s Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), has been named the U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Legal Champion” of 2016 for the Columbus District. Goldfarb will be honored at the SBA’s annual banquet in Columbus, Ohio, on May 5, 2016.

GoldfarbGoldfarb came to Cincinnati Law to create and manage the school’s business clinic, launching ECDC in 2011. Since that time, it has become a coveted learning opportunity for law students and a vital resource for Cincinnati area businesses that cannot afford legal help. Over 120 students have received hands on training, representing 180 business—adding up to nearly $1,000,000 of free legal services to the local economy.

“I’m proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish in a little over five years,” says Goldfarb. “The significant impact of the ECDC can be attributed in large part to community involvement and collaboration, including involvement of local lawyers who graciously volunteer to supervise students and collaborations with local business accelerators and incubators like The Brandery, Mortar Cincinnati, Bad Girl Ventures, Hamilton County Business Center, and First Batch. By working together, we can make a big difference in this community”.

Regarding his designation as the SBA’s “Legal Champion”, Goldfarb says that he will accept the award on behalf of many people — “the many students who’ve staffed the clinic over the years; the volunteers who’ve assisted along the way; the ECDC’s office manager, Lori Strait, who oversees the day-to-day operations of the ECDC office; the community partners who trust us enough to work with them and their companies; and, importantly, the aspiring entrepreneurs in the Cincinnati area who are risking a lot to pursue their dreams and to make Cincinnati a better place for all of us.”

 

Marianna Bettman, Law Professor and Alumnae, Receives University’s Distinguished Teaching Award


Professor Emerita of Practice Marianna Bettman received the University of Cincinnati Distinguished Teaching Professor Award on Tuesday, April 19, 2016.

Marianna BetmanCincinnati, OH—Congratulations to Cincinnati Law graduate and Professor Emerita of Practice Marianna Brown Bettman who received the University of Cincinnati’s Distinguished Teaching Professor Award. The award was presented at the university’s annual Faculty Awards Celebration, presided over by President Santa Ono, Provost Beverly Davenport, and the Faculty Senate.

"We are all exceptionally glad of the recognition Professor Bettman is receiving for being an exceptional educator. She has had a positive influence on the practice of law in Ohio and beyond through the hundreds of students she has taught. I look forward to her continued association with the law school even as she enjoys the much deserved freedom of retirement," said Jennifer S. Bard, Dean and Nippert Professor of Law at Cincinnati Law.

Professor Bettman started her professional career working in community development during the late 60’s, speaking to community members about school desegregation. Recognizing the role legal solutions could play to address racial injustice, she determined that her next career step would be law school at the university. While there, she excelled at school, winning the Constitutional Law Prize and becoming the first woman to be awarded first prize in Trial Advocacy.

After graduation in 1977, Professor Bettman began working in private practice. From there, she was elected Judge, First District Court of Appeals—the first woman elected to this position. She developed an expertise in separation of powers, state constitutional law, and the Ohio judicial system. After six years on the bench, the opportunity arose to join academia, leading her to College of Law in 1999; she remained at the school until recently. Her mastery of material and the high expectations set for students is legendary. Students, in turn, thrived under her style. Noted one, “Professor Bettman keeps us on our toes. You must be well-prepared at all times because you are called on every class!” In addition to teaching, she directed the Judge-In-Residence and Judicial Extern programs.

Professor Bettman is the recipient of numerous awards. They include the following: The Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2005, 2011, 2014), the Excellence in Education Award (Ohio Magazine, 2011), Cincinnati Attorney of the Year (Jewish National Fund, Judge Carl B. Rubin Legal Society, 2010), the Foot Soldiers in the Sand Award (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People-National Chapter, 2008), the A.B. “Dolly” Cohen Award for Excellence in Teaching (University of Cincinnati, 2008), the Nettie Cronies Lutes Award (Ohio State Bar Association, 2008), the University of Cincinnati Law Alumni Association Distinguished Alumna Award (2001), the Women’s Studies Distinguished Alumna Award (University of Cincinnati, 1998), the YWCA Career Woman of Achievement (1994), and many more. She authors the well-respected blog Legally Speaking Ohio and the monthly newspaper column Legally Speaking for the American Israelite, in addition to lecturing at numerous continuing legal education seminars, including an annual presentation at the Ohio Judicial Conference. Professor Bettman retired from teaching in December 2015. However, she is still committed to the law school and the education and training of future generations of attorneys.

Professor Verna Williams participated in a Black Feminist panel


Verna WilliamsProfessor Verna Williams participated in a Black Feminist panel discussion on Black Lives Matter and advocacy around the unique experiences of African American Women hosted by the UC Women’s Center on April 6, 2016.

Associate Dean Sandra Sperino's Article Cited by the EEOC


Sandra SperinoAssociate Dean of Faculty and Professor Sandra Sperino's article, The Sky Remains Intact: Why Allowing Subgroup Evidence is Consistent with the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, 90 Marquette L. Rev. 227 (2006), as cited by the EEOC on April 7, 2016 in an amicus brief filed with the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.